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Introduction To Marvelous Designer



🟡This video tutorial introduces Marvelous Designer, a 3D clothing simulation software. It covers basics such as movement controls and UI, including the 3D view and 2D window.


🟡Viewers learn how to create and simulate garments, adjust properties, sew them together, and use background images for reference. The polygon tool is demonstrated for pattern creation.


🟡The tutorial also covers unfolding and cloning patterns, as well as fixing normal issues. It's a beginner-friendly guide that creates a simple pillow as a project example.





- Workflow

  • Just like other software, Marvelous Designer has its own movement controls.

  • Thankfully Marvelous Designer allows the user to change from the default controls to controls used in other software like Autodesk Maya.

  • To change them, open the Settings/Preferences tab, and click on Preferences.

  • In the new window, click on the View Controls options, then change it from Regular Mode to Maya, and close the window.

  • Now the movement controls are the same as in Autodesk Maya.

  • Holding Alt + Left Click will rotate the camera.

  • Holding Alt + Middle Mouse Button allows you to move around the space.

  • Holding Alt + Right click Zooms the camera in and out. This can also be done by using the scroll wheel.

  • The last thing we want to do in the Settings is check if the Gizmo is set to World Coordinate.

  • On the left side, there is a Sub-menu for garments, avatars, hangers, fabric, etc.

  • Below that is the menu from previous garments we’ve worked on, as well as premade garments from Marvelous like the pants and shirt.

  • The window in the middle is the 3D View where we’ll be working.

  • The window next to is the 2D View where the patterns will be for the garments.

  • On the right side is where the Fabric window is.

  • There, we can add different types of fabric in material and or color.

  • Below the Fabric window is the Properties Editor.

  • In there, we can change the property of each individual fabric.

  • Next to the Fabric window, there is an arrow drop-down button.

  • From there we can change windows from the drop-down.

  • For now, we will not focus on them.

  • Next up is the toolbar above the 3D View.

  • The first tool is for the Cloth Simulations.

  • A keyboard shortcut for the cloth simulation is the Space bar

  • Another tool we’ll be using a lot is the Tacks tool.

  • There is a button and zipper tool that we’ll look at later in this tutorial, and learn how to use them.

  • An interesting tool among all of them is the Sewing tool.

  • The tool has different ways to sew a garment together.

  • Above the 2D View, there is a toolbar with tools only for the patterns.

  • Those tools are for selecting the points and edges of the garments and transforming and moving them as well.

  • The 2D workspace is locked in with the 3D one.

  • Anything we place in the 2D View gets added in the 3D Window.

  • But, if we move anything in the 2D View, it doesn’t move in the 3D Window.

  • This means that the translations and movement of the garments are separate for each window.

  • To move in the 2D space we only need to hold Alt + Middle Mouse button.

  • Zooming in the 2D space is the same qs in the 3D one.

  • To create something, we need to start in the 2D Window first.

  • Select the Rectangle creation tool, hold, and drag on the 2D window to create the size of the cloth.

  • Once you let go of the mouse button, the cloth will appear in the 3D Window, and the pattern will fill up in the 2D Window.

  • Another way to use this tool is to click on the 2D graph, and a new window will open up.

  • In this window, you can change the size of the cloth more precisely.

  • After setting the size, press on the OK button to create the cloth.

  • Just like before, the pattern will fill up in the 2D graph, and appear in the 3D Window.

  • Clicking A on the keyboard will activate the Move Tool for the 2D Window.

  • To move the pattern in the graph, click and drag it anywhere in the 2D space.

  • For the 3D Window, just by clicking on the cloth, a gizmo tool will appear anywhere we’ve clicked.

  • By moving the axis on the gizmo tool we can then move the cloth in the 3D space.

  • With the same tool in the 2D window, dragging the endpoints will make the pattern wider or longer depending on which points you are dragging.

  • If we double-click on the middle point while the tool is active, we can scale the points equally depending on which we are scaling the pattern.

  • Clicking Z on the keyboard will activate the edge tool.

  • With this tool, we can move the edges of the pattern in the 2D graph.

  • We can also see the size of the edge selected with the tool on the edge or on the cursor itself.

  • To turn on the simulation, press the Space bar.

  • In the 3D Window we can see the cloth has fallen down and is no longer a rectangle floating in the air.

  • We can tell when we are in the simulation mode by the cursor.

  • The cursor is now a small hand instead of an arrow.

  • Until the simulation mode is turned off, the cursor will remain a hand.

  • We can click and pick up the cloth, and move it around to fix up the shape.

  • The simulation currently is set to our CPU which gives us better and more accurate simulations, though it will be slower.

  • We can change the simulation to run on the GPU instead, but the simulation will not be as accurate but it will be faster.

  • To change which PC part the simulation will go through, click on the down arrow icon above the 3D Window, and change it from there.

  • When we press Space again, it will run the simulation once more but this time through the GPU.

  • Turn off the simulation by pressing on the Space bar again, and click Ctrl + Z to undo the simulation on the cloth.

- Pillow exercise

  • For our first exercise, we’ll be making a pillow.

  • From the rectangle before, select it and copy and paste it into the 2D graph.

  • You can copy and paste it through the keyboard shortcuts, Ctrl + C for copy, and Ctrl + V to paste, or do it the manual way by right-clicking on the pattern, clicking on copy, then right-click on the empty space in the graph, then clicking on paste.

  • Once we have an exact copy of the pattern, click on N to activate the Sewing tool.

  • When the Sewing tool is active, when we hover over an edge on the pattern it will highlight it blue, and it will give us the measurements for the edge.

  • The cursor will also turn into a sewing machine icon instead of an arrow.

  • To sew two patterns together, click on one edge at the top or bottom, and it is important to click in the same spot for the opposite edge.

  • If you click the top of the edge on the left side, you have to click on the top of the edge on the right side.

  • In the 3D Window, we can see red lines going from one edge to the other like stitches.

  • When we activate the simulation, the two cloths will get stitched together.

  • To undo the simulation click on Ctrl + Z.

  • If you click on the wrong side of the edge when sewing the patterns, the red lines won’t be straight but cross over each other.

  • When we sew patterns like this, the cloths will be sown on different sides.

  • One cloth will be facing the front while the other one will be facing the back.

  • This will cause an issue if you’re using a material with patterns or a different type of fabric that will be noticeable when it is flipped on the wrong side.

  • We can stop a simulation any time we want, even if we are holding the fabric.

  • Going back to making the pillow.

  • With the sewing tool, sow the left and right outer edges.

  • In the 3D Window, click Q to activate the move tool.

  • Click on the cloth and rotate them to face each other.

  • Now we can see how the pillow will be sown better.

  • Sow the top and bottom edges of the cloth by clicking N in the 3D Window.

  • When we run the simulation, we can see that the cloth is facing the right way, and it is also sown correctly.

  • One small issue we’re running into is that the cloth is deflated instead of full and fluffy like a pillow.

  • To change that, when we select one pattern, in the Property Editor, set the Pressure to 5 in the Simulation Properties.

  • Do the same thing for the other pattern, otherwise, when we run the simulation the cloth isn’t going to turn into a pillow.

  • After setting everything up, run the simulation again, and you should get a pillow.

- Pillow exercise 2

  • Delete the patterns in the 2D Window by using the select tool (A), then pressing Delete on your keyboard.

  • For the next exercise, we’ll be adding an image pattern in the 2D Window.

  • To do that, right-click on the 2D graph, and click on Add Background Image.

  • In the new window, click on the folder icon next to the Image File, and select the image from your computer.

  • During this phase, we can scale, and move the image pattern around the graph.

  • Place the image pattern on the graph where the horizontal line splits the pattern perfectly in half.

  • When we press the OK button from the new window, we won’t be able to select or move the image pattern at all, unless we right-click again, and again click on Add Background Image, to make new changes to the image.

  • After placing the image pattern on the graph properly, it is time to move on to the next step.

  • The next step is drawing out half of the bottom pattern using the Polygon tool.

  • Clicking on the 2D graph adds points, and when the points are closed it will create a pattern.

  • To curve the points, when clicking hold Alt.

  • Do this all the time, because if you let go even once, the line between the points won’t curve.

  • Create the entire bottom half of the pattern, making sure the points are closed so that the pattern can be created.

  • To see the image better underneath the pattern, activate the Translucent Surface.

  • We can see that some parts of the pattern didn’t turn out correctly to the image in the back.

  • To fix this, click on the C key to activate the tool we need to fix the edges.

  • Click and drag the edge into place with this tool according to the image in the background.

  • After fixing the edges, click Z, right-click the top edge, and click on Unfold.

  • Now the pattern is mirrored on the other side.

  • We can create a copy of the pattern in the 2D graph that will also be sown to the first pattern with just one click.

  • Right-click the pattern in the 2D Window, and click Layer Clone (Over).

  • Click above the pattern to make the second one.

  • In the 3D Window, we can see there are now two patterns next to each other.

  • Move the front one with the gizmo to reveal that they are indeed sown together.

  • One issue though, the pattern in the back is facing the wrong side.

  • To fix this, click A for the select tool, right-click on the back pattern in the 3D space, and click on Flip Normal.

  • Doing this will fix the way the pattern is facing.

  • When we run the simulation we have an interesting-looking pillow.

  • If your pillow isn’t fluffy, change the Pressure in the Property Editor to 5.

  • If the back pattern was facing the wrong way, the pillow would’ve not fluffed up.

  • One way to prevent this without Flipping the Normal is to set the Pressure tp -5 on the pattern with the unflipped normals, so when the simulation is run, the two values cancel each other out and the pillow fluffens up.

  • For another exercise, delete the second pattern.

  • Select it, double-click on the center dot, and scale it a bit.

  • Click Z, then select all the edges, and click on Offset as Internal Line.

  • In the new menu, set the distance to 40 mm and press OK.

  • This will create an inner edge in the pattern.

  • Select the inside edge, right-click it, and click on Cut & Sew.

  • This will separate the pattern into two pieces that are sown together.

  • Select the inner pattern, right-click it, and click on Layer Clone (Over).

  • Select the new pattern in the 3D space, move it out, and flip the normals.

  • Now when we run the simulation, the pillow will have a nice outside cloth sown onto it.

  • If you want to make the cloth bigger, select the outside edges, right-click it, and select Offset Pattern Outline.

  • Set the Distance in the new window to 100mm, then press OK.

  • Set the Pressure for that pattern to 0 to get a better simulation.







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